Breast Cancer Axillary Ultrasound: Find involved nodes

Share it with your friends Like

Thanks! Share it with your friends!

Close

We teach you how a simple ultrasound of your axillary lymph nodes can tell you more about your breast cancer and expand your treatment options.

VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS:
http://www.breastcancercourse.org

LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS:
http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/

FOLLOW US:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/
__
Questions for your Breast Surgeon:

1. Will you ultrasound my axillary lymph nodes today?
2. If not, will you order an axillary ultrasound by a radiologist?
3. Would my treatment change if we found cancer in my axillary nodes?
4. What are the benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo?
5. Why is Neoadjuvant Chemo recommended more now?
6. Why ultrasound my axillary lymph nodes before surgery?

At diagnosis, one third of patients already have cancer in the lymph nodes under their arm (axilla). When the “Axillary Lymph Nodes” are involved with breast cancer your cancer is more threatening one. This information can dramatically change your treatment options.

Studies have shown that “positive” axillary lymph nodes are commonly missed by your breast surgeon’s physical examination. A 5-minute ultrasound of your axilla can more accurately find cancer in these nodes. A pre-operative axillary ultrasound is a “cutting edge” advance in breast cancer care. Make sure to ask your breast surgeon about an axillary ultrasound when they are examining you. Many large cancer centers routinely utilize pre-operative axillary ultrasounds.

How can this change my treatment plan?

If an obviously abnormal node is found before surgery, then you have a more serious cancer. If appropriate, an ultrasound guided needle biopsy can be performed to confirm the node is involved with cancer. If you have cancer in your nodes, you will likely require chemotherapy either before (neoadjuvant chemotherapy) or after surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy). Regardless of the findings of an axillary ultrasound, a surgical evaluation of your axillary lymph nodes will be needed when you undergo a definitive breast cancer surgery. The surgical procedures used today for lymph nodes are a “sentinel node biopsy” or an “axillary dissection.”

What are the benefits of knowing you have involved nodes?

Knowing you have “node positive” breast cancer before surgery can empower your breast cancer team to search for more sophisticated treatment options. A simple axillary ultrasound for early stage breast cancer identifies more “node positive” patients. If you are found early in your journey to have node positive breast cancer, more  pre-operative treatment options may be considered. We list some of the treatment benefits below.

Multidisciplinary Cancer Team

Lymph node “positive” breast cancer requires a more sophisticated treatment approach. An axillary ultrasound can help determine if you would benefit from a “multidisciplinary team” approach early on in your care, before surgery. Ask your breast specialists to present your unique cancer situation to their team so you will benefit from new ideas and cutting-edge treatment advances.

Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

When you know you have involved lymph nodes at diagnosis, you likely will be offered chemotherapy at some point in your treatment. There can be distinct advantages to having chemotherapy before surgery, rather than afterwards. This is known as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This complex decision is worth discussing with your breast surgeon. Breast surgeons choose the initial direction of your entire breast cancer treatment plan. An axillary ultrasound can better identify if you are a candidate for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Take our lesson on “Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy” to learn more about the potential benefits of this treatment approach.

Comments

Write a comment