Asian Influenza Vaccination Spot #4 1957 US Public Health Service-NLM

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“These television spots were designed to encourage individual and family vaccination against the Asian flu pandemic of 1957, an outbreak of influenza that was first identified in February 1957 in East Asia and subsequently spread worldwide. Produced by the Communicable Disease Center of the United States Public Health Service.”

Originally a public domain film from the US National Library of Medicine, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza_pandemic
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

An influenza pandemic is an epidemic of an influenza virus that spreads on a worldwide scale and infects a large proportion of the world population. In contrast to the regular seasonal epidemics of influenza, these pandemics occur irregularly—there have been about 9 influenza pandemics during the last 300 years. Pandemics can cause high levels of mortality, with the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic being the worst in recorded history; this pandemic was estimated to be responsible for the deaths of approximately 50–100 million people. There have been about three influenza pandemics in each century for the last 300 years, the most recent one being the 2009 flu pandemic.

Influenza pandemics occur when a new strain of the influenza virus is transmitted to humans from another animal species. Species that are thought to be important in the emergence of new human strains are pigs, chickens and ducks. These novel strains are unaffected by any immunity people may have to older strains of human influenza… Influenza A viruses can occasionally be transmitted from wild birds to other species causing outbreaks in domestic poultry and may give rise to human influenza pandemics. The propagation of influenza viruses throughout the world is thought in part to be by bird migrations…

The World Health Organization (WHO) has produced a six-stage classification that describes the process by which a novel influenza virus moves from the first few infections in humans through to a pandemic…

One strain of virus that may produce a pandemic in the future is a highly pathogenic variation of the H5N1 subtype of influenza A virus. On 11 June 2009, a new strain of H1N1 influenza was declared to be a global pandemic (Stage 6) by the WHO…

Asian Flu (1957–1958)

The “Asian Flu” was a category 2 flu pandemic outbreak of avian influenza that originated in China in early 1956 lasting until 1958. It originated from mutation in wild ducks combining with a pre-existing human strain. The virus was first identified in Guizhou…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza_A_virus_subtype_H2N2

H2N2 is a subtype of the influenza A virus. H2N2 has mutated into various strains including the Asian flu strain (now extinct in the wild), H3N2, and various strains found in birds. It is also suspected of causing a human pandemic in 1889. The geographic spreading of the 1889 Russian flu have been studied and published…

Asian flu

The category 2 Asian flu pandemic outbreak of influenza A virus originated in China in early 1956, and lasted until 1958. Some authors believe it originated from a mutation in wild ducks combining with a pre-existing human strain. Other authors are less certain. The virus was first identified in Guizhou. It spread to Singapore in February 1957, reached Hong Kong by April, and the US by June. The death toll in the US was about 69,800. Estimates of worldwide deaths caused by this pandemic varies widely depending on source, ranging from one to four million, with WHO settling on “about two million”.

Asian flu was of the H2N2 subtype (a notation that refers to the configuration of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins in the virus) of type A influenza, and an influenza vaccine was developed in 1957 to contain its outbreak.

The Asian flu strain later evolved via antigenic shift into H3N2, which caused a milder pandemic from 1968 to 1969.

Both the H2N2 and H3N2 pandemic strains contained avian influenza virus RNA segments. “While the pandemic human influenza viruses of 1957 (H2N2) and 1968 (H3N2) clearly arose through reassortment between human and avian viruses, the influenza virus causing the ‘Spanish flu’ in 1918 appears to be entirely derived from an avian source (Belshe 2005).”…

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james norse says:

before autism scare nonsense existed..

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