How to Read Math

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Baffled by equations, well no more! Continue learning at this video’s sponsor https://brilliant.org/dos

Lots of people find mathematical equations intimidating because they don’t make sense. But they are not hard to understand if you follow a few steps, anyone can learn to read them. And it is well worth it because they are so incredibly useful to describe everything in math and physics. If you already know I’m sure you know someone who might like this video, I’m going to send it to my family who are less mathematically inclined than me.

The steps you need to know are: 1. Find the variables, 2. Work out what all of the different mathematical symbols mean, 3. Wok out what order you would perform the mathematical operations if you were going to plug numbers in to the equations. These steps really help you get your head around what an equation is telling you. Also, don’t be scared about the greek letters, they do just the same thing as normal letters, they either represent constants or variables.

The Math Notation Cheat Sheet is here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/95869671@N08/40544016221/in/dateposted-public/
And available to buy here: https://www.redbubble.com/people/dominicwalliman/works/30597060-mathematics-notation-cheat-sheet
Get high res versions by supporting me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/domainofscience

POSTERS: I have other posters available to buy here: https://www.redbubble.com/people/dominicwalliman

I have also made a version available for educational use which you can find here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/95869671@N08/?

Thanks so much to my supporters on Patreon. If you enjoy my videos and would like to help me make more this is the best way and I appreciate it very much. https://www.patreon.com/domainofscience

Also, if you enjoyed this video, you will probably like my science books, available in all good books shops around the work and is printed in over 20 languages. Links are below or just search for Professor Astro Cat. They are fun children’s books aimed at the age range 4+ and 7+. But they are also a hit with adults who want good explanations of science. The books have won awards and the app won a Webby.

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This is a cheat sheet with a lot of the basic mathematical notation you will come across in popular science.

This ties in with a youtube video which you can watch here: https://youtu.be/Kp2bYWRQylk

And if you would like to buy it as a poster or sticker you can get hold of it here: https://www.redbubble.com/people/dominicwalliman/works/30597060-mathematics-notation-cheat-sheet
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Tags:
math, mathematics, equation, formula, explainer, algebra, constants, variables, science, animation, maths, calculus, trigonometry, scicomm, stem

Comments

Aaditya Chandrasekhar says:

I think this video befits high school math and nothing beyond that!

hαʍzα αl αzαωι says:

I wish if you download translate to Arabic to benefit to all

XxMinetyxX says:

I need to know how to read math in english, I’m from Mexico and they never tell me how to say + – x x/y etc

Keeper Web says:

Great and helpful video! Thank you!
For SCD guys, I realized that SUM is just a for loop. i=100 SUM i=0, i^2 is for(sum= 0, i= 0; i!= 100; i++){ sum+= i^2;}.

dank pumpkin says:

wow great explanation ,you have a gift of teacher that most profession teacher dont even have. You take something that took me weeks of studying and made me understand it in less than 7 minutes great job man . You got a new sub great work

Two goats [No pigs] says:

Perhaps you could show how to read aloud your equations, such as,
y = (a – b)/(c + d)
is read as
"y equals the quantity a minus b,
divided by the quantity c plus d".

Not just the symbols.
Math(s) is a language.

Jabberwocky says:

Googling weird symbols from linear algebra is the worst.

Tom Su says:

What about the "for all" and "there exist" quantifiers? Propositional operators?

Иван Банных says:

Reading linear algebra properly would be awesoem

dark venom says:

Please make à video on calculus please

Timofey Filin says:

One video is not enough to explain calculus. It takes about one semester at a university to properly understand it. LOL.

Arthur 38000 says:

From my point of view you miss the most important in the understanding of an equation:
Just draw The equation. Or just draw what do you understood ! Or ask someone to draw it for you.

Drawing is so expressive for your brain.
(you make videos with picture, not just equations ;))

computadorasana says:

I see you from México! I love your videos

infundere says:

Very nice animations! have a nice day!

Suvi-Tuuli Allan says:

Thank you! This really helped me understand the Higgs mechanism.

f4614n says:

I think the examples at 5:27 were not well chosen for this introduction. As the integral here does not converge, we can't really assign 'A' to this without using limits.

As you are trying to explain operators here, it would maybe have been less confusing, to apply both of them on the right-hand side of the equation to some function. The derivative here is more than anything else asking to be solved for y using integration and leading to the integral on the left.

James Groomes says:

one is a question two is another question
1) Recommend a textbook that will take me from, base camp mathematics, to entering the dragon ( non statistical thermodynamics )? I want to theorize about heat in my life, and to comprehend Prigogine. Please!

I went at it this summer studying at work and at home but without basically the content of this video there was no traction. So this is another great one that I really appreciate if you ever want a bottle opener or something msg me.

I'm planning to use brilliant because I need to calculate changes in measurements, in material( iron ), when mass is redistributed ( forged )

Black Hole says:

4:22 Actually it's a Sigma not an Epsilon. But still a good video from u.

James Groomes says:

make sure to follow Dom oninstagram!!

Daniel Bloom says:

I love calculus you should do a whole video on it

Felipe Mezoni says:

dude, you should know how important your work is for me and probably for many people in the same way. i want to become a scientist and/or a teacher and the country i live have a very poor basic education but then we have entrance tests system for universities which is based on basic education which is, like i said, for the most part, poor education. then me, after i finished school, need to study by my self all again from basics everything in order to know what and why exactly i should in the past but didn't learn, as well as learn all the extracurricular stuff that normal young people should get to know better their own personal interests.

Alternative Hobo says:

Make one about "programing".
Nice vid.

josh mcgee says:

this is an outstanding video that clearly summarises so many fundamental concepts. I will likely be linking people to this for years to come

doodelay says:

This is not how to read math, it's rules. Reading is very different than this and reading math like an english sentence can be done.

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